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Gangs of Wasseypur (2012)   Genre: Crime

Gangs of Wasseypur
Runtime: 320 Minutes
Genre: Crime
Release date: June 22, 2012
0.0 / 10  (0 votes)
Towards the end of colonial India, Shahid Khan loots the British trains, impersonating the legendary Sultana Daku. Now outcast, Shahid becomes a worker at Ramadhir Singh’s colliery, only to spur a revenge battle that passes on to generations. At the turn of the decade, Shahid’s son, the philandering Sardar Khan vows to get his father’s honor back, becoming the most feared man of Wasseypur. Staying true to its real life influences, the film explores this revenge saga through the socio-political dynamic in erstwhile Bihar (North India), in the coal and scrap trade mafia of Wasseypur, through the imprudence of a place obsessed with mainstream ‘Bollywood’ cinema.
Director: Anurag Kashyap
Writer: Anurag Kashyap

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Add Crew for Gangs of Wasseypur

Sardar Khan  Actor
 --- Actor
Faizal  Actor
Durga  Actor
Najma  Actor
 --- Director
 --- Writer
 --- Producer

Critics Reviews :  13 Reviews Average Ratings: 6.8

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Vivek Bhatia
Vivek Bhatia
FilmFare.com
Anurag Kashyap’s ambitious gangster saga is a trippy outburst of vivid characters reeking of revenge, deep-seethed rivalries blended with an off-kilter soundtrack and clever dialogue. Although, self-indulgent in parts the film manages to say a lot in approx 160 minutes of runtime. Working on a similar template as Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather (1972), Gangs of Wasseypur lacks the polished story-telling but in entirety makes for a decent Indianised version of the American epic.
8
Sify
Sify
Sify
The performances sparkle with earnestness and zing. Shahid Kapoor is so good in the film, he’s sure to increase his fan-following several fold. He’s excellent in each of the stories, and one can imagine viewers debating on where he was the best. Priyanka Chopra matches step with a superb performance easily slipping in-and-out of the layered characters with dexterity.
6
Even at a runtime of almost three hours, the movie, at no point, seems stretched or monotonous and there isn't a single dull moment. The narrative binds you to an extent that you don't mind watching the impending sequel (another two and a half hours) at a single stretch, since the incomplete first part leaves you on a restless note and asking for more. Unlike Ram Gopal Varma's Raktha Charitra that was split into two parts more for commercial considerations, Anurag Kashyap's Gangs of Wasseypur justifies its need for two episodes since its source material has enough 'meat'. In fact much like a sticky soap opera episode, Kashyup smartly ends the first part on such a note that you hate him for the abrupt and inconclusive end, yet see the promise that the second chapter of the gang-war holds.
Rollicking and riotous aren’t adjectives one normally associates with a gangster film. But that is precisely what Anurag Kashyap’s Gangs of Wasseypur is. The smartly filmed vendetta saga tosses and turns convulsively from one shootout to another as a bunch of amoral human bloodhounds sniff around for their next kill in a volatile, lawless landscape. The unbridled violence and fetid language – the expletives fly as thick and fast as the bullets – are, however, only one facet of this cinematically layered shot at a time-honoured and popular genre. The spirit of no-holds-barred derring-do embedded in the narrative sinews of Gangs of Wasseypur is so pronounced that there is little in the film that goes along expected lines. Gangs of Wasseypur is part Sergio Leone, part Sam Peckinpah on the one hand. On the other, it embraces elements from Quentin Tarantino and Johnnie To. But the manner in which Kashyap stamps his own home-grown style and sensibility on the manic mélange makes it an exhilaratingly edgy movie experience. The sprawling epic – this is only part one, part two is due for release later in the year – is set in the crime-infested coal town of Dhanbad and its Bollywood-obsessed environs, where mining contractors and scrap dealers are locked in a deadly power struggle spanning across decades. Gangs of Wasseypur is a full-on Bollywood film without quite being one. Loaded with action, romance and music and doffs of the hat to old-school masala, this effervescent blazing-guns opera is ingeniously orchestrated in a way that lends it the flounce and flair of an artful musical romp.It delivers shock and delight in equal measure as it portrays the often pointless spiral of violence, which is presented matter-of-factly as an inevitable legacy of the area’s benighted history.Composer Sneha Khanwalkar peppers Gangs of Wasseypur with music pieces drawn from Bihari folk (including some overtly risqué ditties), popular film songs of the different decades the narrative traverses, and Trinidadian chutney rhythms. Even the blood-splattered action scenes are choreographed like set-pieces, often to the accompaniment of insistent drumbeats and robust songs. It’s a concoction that is brilliantly heady and varied: the music adds an experiential layer to the film that lingers long after it has run its 160-minute course. Gangs of Wasseypur benefits immensely from a towering performance by Manoj Bajpayee, who immerses himself in the central character of Sardar Khan with such conviction and controlled flair that it becomes impossible to separate the actor from the part. The rest of the cast, too, is consistently in step with the benchmark he sets. The film straddles two principal spaces – the town itself (where the action begins a few years before the end of the Raj) and Wasseypur (once a village off Dhanbad but now a part of its expanding semi-urban spread).It kicks into high gear from the word go with a flash-forward to the very culmination of the long-running blood feud between two clans, and then pulls all the way back to 1941 to trace the genesis of the conflict.There is an info overload in the initial 30 minutes as the character played by Piyush Mishra, a sort of sutradhar who is an integral part of Sardar’s family but serves only as an observant spectator, spells out the social and historical backdrop in intermittent voiceovers. But the context that seems so important at the outset is conveniently jettisoned once the action begins to unfold in right earnest. While that robs Gangs of Wasseypur of its high-minded intent and arrests its vaulting ambition of being a chronicle of a god-forsaken speck on the map, it also frees the film from the burdensome baggage that harping on the tangled politics of the place would have entailed. Sardar’s father, Shahid Khan (Jaideep Ahlawat), impersonates a mythic brigand to rob British trains. He meets his end at the hands of an ambitious coal contractor Ramadhir Singh (Tigmanshu Dhulia), who wants to monopolise the terrain. But Sardar has other ideas. He vows not to let the hair grow back on his shaved pate until he has avenged his colliery worker-father’s killing,But the murderous Sardar Khan has a softer side that is vulnerable to feminine seduction. The two women in his life – the feisty, foul-mouthed Nagma (Richa Chadha) and the more reticent but equally shrewish Durga (Reema Sen) – are the only people who can keep the marauder on his toes. He also has to contend with a pair of sworn enemies – Sultan, who belongs to a clan that has held sway over Wasseypur for decades, and, of course, the contractor-turned-politician Ramadhir in Dhanbad. Against both, Sardar Khan’s skirmishes are bitter and extremely violent.Each of Sardar’s sons, four from Nagma, one from Durga, has a story apportioned to him. On the strength of what we see here, the most interesting of all is the tale of Faizal Khan (Nawazuddin Siddiqui), a drug addict who appears barely capable of taking over the reins from his father. Between running botched-up errands for his demanding dad, Faizal falls for Mohsina (Huma Quraishi), and this romantic track is among the most delightfully quirky components of this flamboyant film.When Faizal touches Mohsina’s hand for the first as they sit by a pond, her reaction is self-righteously coy but delectably manipulative. She accuses Faizal of trying to take advantage of her. ‘How dare you touch me without asking for permission,’ Mohsina intones. A befuddled Faizal gropes helplessly for an answer. It’s moments of pure inspiration like these, and there are plenty, that lift Gangs of Wasseypur above the constrictions of the genre. It may not be for the faint-hearted and the prissy. Gangs of Wasseypur is a heavyweight knockout punch. You’re down for the count!
7
Kunal Guha
Kunal Guha
Yahoo
While the story is too long and tiring to narrate, just defining the lead cast will fill up this page. Sardar Khan (Manoj Bajpai) has a one-point agenda: avenge his father’s death from coal mine owner-turned-politician Vidhayak Ramadhir Singh (Tigmanshu Dhulia). Circumstances lead Khan to a dual life. In one, he is married to Najma (Richa Chadda) and has three sons and in the other, he is seduced by Durga’s (Reemma Sen) sexy back to have another son from her. He also has two sidekicks, the forever grumpy Farhan (Piyush Mishra) and the Rajkumar Hirani-lookalike Asgar Khan (Jameel Khan). Through most of the film, Sardar is either battling Ramadhir Singh or the Quereshis who had driven him out of Wasseypur initially. The story takes a romantic turn after a giant time leap. Sardar’s sons grow up to pursue their respective love interests, leading to some priceless comic scenes. The film concludes with a predictable climax and if you were awake through most of the film, you can guess the end atleast 15 minutes before the closing credits.
6
Taran Adarsh
Taran Adarsh
Bollywood Hungama
On the whole, GANGS OF WASSEYPUR symbolizes the fearless new Indian cinema that shatters the clichés and conventional formulas, something which Anurag Kashyap has come to be acknowledged for. It has all the trappings of an entertainer, but with a difference. The film prides itself with substance that connects with enthusiasts of new-age cinema. But, I wish to restate, one needs to have a really strong belly to soak up to a film like GANGS OF WASSEYPUR. Also, this striking movie-watching experience comes with a colossal length and duration. The reactions, therefore, would be in extremes. GANGS OF WASSEYPUR is for that segment of spectators who seek pleasure in watching forceful, hard-hitting and gritty movies.
7
Mansha Rastogi
Mansha Rastogi
Nowrunning
Gangs of Wasseypur works like an explosive leaving you wanting for more. Gangs of Wasseypur part 2 will definitely be a film eagerly awaited! Devour part one in the meantime!
6
Raja Sen
Raja Sen
www.rediff.com
Yet it is the excess that suffocates all the magic, originality dying out for lack of room to breathe. Kashyap gets flavour, setting and character right, but the lack of economy cripples the film. There is a lot of gunfire, but like the fine actors populating its sets, Wasseypur fires too many blanks.
5
Blessy Chettiar
Blessy Chettiar
DNA India
Written by Zeishan Quadri, Akhilesh, Sachin Ladia and Kashyap, GOW I runs for over two hours. Cuss words and smart repartee are commonplace, with the women being at the centre of most comedic encounters of the men. The sexual tension doubles up as comic relief in the fast-paced thriller. Kashyap’s characters are, no doubt, dangerous. They’re also prone to screwing up. They may be deadly gangsters, but they also fall face down every now and then. A sister defying her rogue brother to marry a lover from a rival clan, a pregnant wife beating up her hooligan husband for cheating on her, another wife refusing to become a ‘bachche paida karnewali machine’. The casting is bang on. Chadda, Dhulia and many others are finds.
7
Zee News
Zee News
Zee News
Stories of gang wars and mafias have been churned out by Bollywood at frequent intervals, but Anurag Kashyap here, truly deserves a standing ovation for presenting a masterpiece with his new release ‘Gangs of Wasseypur’. Exposing the dark underbelly of small-town India, which was unexplored till now, Kashyap’s GOW is a mother of all revenge drama. Something that, you may have not seen in the recent past.
8
Roshni Devi
Roshni Devi
KoiMoi
Gangs Of Wasseypur is a good movie brought down because of the confusing plot and length.
9
Mayank Shekhar
Mayank Shekhar
Daily Bhaskar
Gangs Of Wasseypur is fictionalised, demented history soaked in blood. Movies have a gender. This one is fully male. Given how easy it is to kill off people in this picture, it's a miracle that they're all not dead yet! The community of Qureishis take on other Musalmans. Loud sounds of kattas (country-made pistols), rifles, revolvers, butcher’s knives, ice picks envelope your senses. If it wasn’t a film, this would’ve been a stylised graphic novel. But you would’ve missed a memorable background score and striking sound design. For a film, it’s the kind of mini-series you could possibly preserve in a boxed DVD set years from now. Yeah, this one’s for keeps.
7
Martin D'Souza
Martin D'Souza
Glamsham
 GANGS OF WASSEYPUR is buried in the heartland of Bihar from where emerge a melange of characters that define Kashyap's latest caper which encompasses pre-independence days as well, up until the 1990s. To have a grip on a story on paper is one thing, to translate it into a visual with every nuance weighed delicately and executed with finesse takes class of another level. Kashyap goes deep into every character, defining motives and giving a make-over to their persona apart from setting the locales to the 'T'. Not a single character is out of sync.
6

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